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Airbus achieves automatic air-to-air refuelling contact

AIRBUS DEFENCE and Space has successfully demonstrated automatic air-toair refuelling (AAR) contacts with a fighter aircraft from a tanker’s refuelling boom – the first time in the world that this has been achieved.

Airbus’ A310 MRTT company development aircraft performed six automatic contacts with an F- 16 of the Portuguese Air Force in a demonstration of a technique which the company believes holds great promise for enhancing in-service AAR operations. The system requires no additional equipment on the receiver and is intended to reduce boom operator workload, improve safety, and optimise the rate of AAR in operational conditions to maximise combat efficiency. It could be introduced on the current production A330 MRTT as soon as 2019. Initial approach and tracking of the receiver is performed by the tanker’s Air Refuelling Operator (ARO) as usual.

Innovative passive techniques such as image processing are then used to determine the receiver’s refuelling receptacle position and when the automated system is activated, a fully automated flight control system directs the boom towards the receiver’s receptacle. The telescopic beam inside the boom can be controlled in a range of ways including: manually by the ARO; a relative distance-keeping mode; or full auto-mode to perform the contact.

airbus refuelling

In the test flight off the Portuguese coast, the tanker performed the scheduled six contacts, at flight conditions of 270 knots and 25 000 feet over a one hour, 15-minute test period. Both crews reported a faultless operation.

David Piatti, Airbus Test ARO, or “boomer”, on the tanker, said: “The most important thing was that the system could track the receptacle. It was very satisfying because it worked perfectly and we could perform the contacts with the automation switched on as planned. It will certainly reduce workload, especially in degraded weather conditions.”

The F-16 pilot, known by his call sign “Prime”, said: “The test mission was pretty uneventful and accomplished with no unexpected issues, which is a good sign. From the moment that the boomer accepted the contact the boom was immediately in the correct spot.

“For the contact itself, it was very precise and expeditious. You can notice the difference – the less that you feel in the cockpit then the more precise you know the tracking is.”......................... For the FULL ARTICLE please subscribe to our digital edition.

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